The U.S. Armed force has effectively propelled a Kestrel Eye observation microsatellite on board a SpaceX mission to the International Space Station.

The dispatch occurred at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Monday and included payload resupply for the ISS team. The Kestrel Eye will be conveyed from the ISS following a planned Japanese isolated space analyze.

The Kestrel Eye is a 50-kilogram electro-optical symbolism satellite about the extent of a little fridge. It is intended to hand-off orbital surveillance symbolism specifically to officers on the ground instead of through stations in the mainland United States.

The Army guarantees that the little satellites can be put into space at $2 million a piece once it enters full-creation, enabling more to be sent than regular satellites.

“Lower cost satellites can be conveyed in bigger numbers to give higher returns to and offload request from national specialized means satellites,” program appointee chief Mark Ray said in a news discharge.

The Army anticipates that each satellite will have an administration life of over a year.

The Kestrel Eye dispatch will fill in as a proving ground and innovation demonstrator to decide if to go into full organization of the framework. On the off chance that the program goes ahead, the Army could possibly dispatch many the microsatellites over the life of the program.